Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Literary Things: Seven Books That Changed My Life

What's up with this photo?
     One of my WIPpet buddies, Emily, nominated several of us WIPpeters for the versatile blog award. I get to tell you seven things about myself. And do you know what? Since all of us WIPpeters are literary types, I'm going to tell you about the seven books that have most changed my life. And guess what else? This just makes the perfect post to include in Thursday's Children link up, where authors talk about what inspires them!

Classics

1. Crime and Punishment. If Dostoevsky had never written his masterpiece, I would have never met my husband. A love affair with Russian literature led to a short trip to Russia. Said trip to Russia led me to my husband-to-be (who is quite American, by the way, but who has been to Russia twice).

2. Anna Karenina. This was an obvious next-step for me after reading Crime and Punishment. Dostoevsky opened the door to Russian lit. Tolstoy created a breathtaking mansion and invited me to stay forever.

3. Les Miserables. No other work makes me prouder to be part of the human race, inspires me to be a more loving person, or inflicts me with such pity for those who suffer unjustly.

Christian Lit

4. Safely Home. This novel by Randy Alcorn holds the distinction of being the first book that ever made me cry.

5. The Zion Chronicles. This was the first historical fiction series I ever read. The author did an amazing job weaving a dozen or so plots and subplots together. I realized that if a person could pay such great attention to the details in her character's lives, then God must be infinitely more in control of my own life. A profound and important lesson for me to learn as a teen.


Kids Lit

6. The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle. This remains one of my favorite adventure stories. If you haven't read it, think Treasure Island with a little more grit and with a girl protagonist instead of Jim Hawkins. This novel by Avi was the first book I read that had swearing in it. At first I felt guilty in that dangerous, this-is-kind-of-exciting kind of way. It was the first time a book ever made me feel rebellious.

7. Percy Jackson. Since I grew up in a conservative home where fantasy reading was not encouraged or even allowed, it was a huge stretch for me to let my son pick up the Percy Jackson series. I read each book as well so we could discuss the story, and I'm happy to say that Rick Riordan successfully shattered my preconceived notions about the acceptability of fantasy literature in a Christian home.

What About You? Add your most influential books in the comment section!

Random Fact #25: My first fight with Phillip was about Crime and Punishment. We were arguing about whether Dostoevsky intended the reader to sympathize with Raskolnikov or not. I was right. My husband was wrong.

Blog Hop Love: The Thursday's Children blog hop is for authors to write about what inspires them. Thanks again to Rhiann Wynn-Nolet and Kristina Pere for hosting, and everyone else ... consider yourselves invited to join the blog hop fun!

Versatile Blogger Award: The rules for the Versatile Blogger award are as follows:
  1. Thank and link to the person who gave you the award.
  2. Tell seven facts about yourself.
  3. Pass it on to seven other bloggers.
  4. Link to specific posts on their blogs so they’ll be notified by pingback
Nominees: 

21 comments:

  1. I am so very flattered, thank you huge! One of my favorite books of all time is The God of Small Things. It's fiction and I think amazing. Sad, though. Thank you huge for the award!

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    1. I don't know that one Kristi. Sounds interesting!!

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  2. I love that you met your husband in a foreign country, and all as a result of a book. That is awesome! Thank you so much for the blog award. I still have two I haven't gotten to yet, but that by no means indicates a lack of appreciation on my part - just lack of time and running out of anything interesting to say about myself :)

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    1. No rush Rhiann, but I'd love to see your post when it's done!

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  3. It's pretty awesome that Crime & Punishment lead to your meeting the love of your life, that is very cool : ) When I was a kid, I read Scarlett (the sequel to Gone With the Wind) over and over again and I fell in love with Scarlett's strength. Now, to be honest I haven't read that book in years and I don't know if the writing is something I'd be able to appreciate today but I know how it made me feel at the time- it led to my admiration of strong female characters who know what they want and don't wait around for a hero to get it for them, they become the hero. So, as a kid that was one of the most influential books I'd read. As an adult, I'm not sure...there are so many to choose from!

    This was a great post and congratulations on your nomination!

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    1. Yes, Scarlett is a strong woman. I can see why you were inclined toward her!

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  4. The Bridge to Terabithia was the first book to ever move me to tears. And not just any tears - huge, sobbing sloppy tears. Of course, as soon as I finished it, I turned right around and read it again. :)

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    1. Yes, I remember that being a very sad one too. :( No slobbery tears for me though. :)

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  5. Isn't having a husband who supports your writing endeavors wonderful!?!

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    1. Yeah, that comment threw me for a loop until I saw your other comment!

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  6. Lovely story that the book Crime and Punishment led to your meeting your husband. And your top book pic are shining examples of the human race. (BTW, thanks for the tip about The Red Violin--must watch)

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    1. Thanks Karen! Let me know if you like the Red Violin!!

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  7. I just love that: 'If Dostoevsky had never written his masterpiece, I would have never met my husband.' I've not read The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle but it sounds like something I would have enjoyed reading as a kid (and still would now).

    One of my favourite books of all time is Geraldine Brooks' The Year of Wonders, which tells the story of a Derbyshire village and its inhabitants during the plague year of 1665/66. A stunning book.

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    1. Yes, that does sound like a good book. I do still really love good historical fiction, especially when it highlights aspects of history that are often overlooked.

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  8. http://christabellesplace.blogspot.com/2013/05/my-seven-blessings.html

    I'm on the ball, today! I guess I must be feeling better. ;)

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  9. Ooh! I just blogged about Charlotte Doyle. I have a deep love of her! Also, Number the Stars by Lois Lowry. I was thrilled when my niece fell in love with it, too.

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    1. Awesome! I'm off to check out your blog now for your post on Charlotte!

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  10. I am so honored that you nominated me! I hope I will be able to respond to it next week! Thank you so very much!! xoxo

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  12. Just in case you missed it: http://icansaymama.blogspot.com/2013/07/the-versatile-blogger-meets-semper.html

    Thank you, once again!

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